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Ft.Beausejour
Constructed in 1751, Fort Beauséjour was built in response to the British having built Fort Lawrence across the Missiquash river, which divided British-held Nova Scotia from Acadia.

In June, 1755, the British, under the leadership of Lieutenant Colonel Robert Monckton, took the fort and renamed it Fort Cumberland. The fort imprisoned Acadians who had at first escaped to the woods but was also used as a temporary prison for others who would be deported from the region.

During the American Revolution of 1776 some Acadians joined forces with Jonathan Eddy [the Eddy Rebellion] in a failed attempt to retake Fort Cumberland from the British.

Ft.Beausejour
This is what remained of Fort Beauséjour in 1885

List of Acadian Prisoners at Fort Cumberland as of August 24, 1763

Fort Beauséjour was renamed Fort Cumberland
when it fell to the British. Since 1926 it has been an historic site maintained by Canada Parks Service and is known today as
Fort Beauséjour.


At the time of the Treaty of Paris on February 10, 1763, nearly 2,000 Acadians were living as prisoners of war, at Halifax, Windsor (Pisiquid), (Cumberland) Pointe Beauséjour at the St-Jean River. The Duke of Nivernois, ambassador of France in England, having expatriated the Acadians who had been prisoners in England, had them write to their imprisoned compatriots in Nova Scotia inviting them to return to France. A list was requested containing the names of those who desired to return to France. It seems that 87 Acadians of Rivière St-Jean, 694 from Halifax and 1,019 from Boston chose to leave. A list of the prisoners at Beauséjour, containing 374 names, was sent through the Governor of Saint-Pierre et Miquelon. The first time it was published by La Société Historique Acadienne of Moncton, New Brunswick in 1965, it was believed to be the first time this unedited list was being published.

Most of these names are those of Acadians who were captured on the Memramcook and Peticodiac Rivers by military parties sent from Fort Cumberland (Beauséjour) or perhaps others coming from Cocagne and Miramichi who had made their oath of allegiance in 1760. English authorities now considering them to be British subjects, refused to let them go. The following year, they were offered land but most among them prefered to escape secretly to the Saint-Pierre and Miquelon Islands and from there to France, to Saint-Domingue and to Louisiana.

Nonetheless, many then returned from Miquelon to Cap-Breton, or to the Gulf coast, as did Joseph Goguen when he returned to Cocagne thus creating new Acadian settlements/villages.

In viewing a copy of the document before me it should be said that those on the list stated that they did not know how to sign their names and made their usual mark, which was an X.


Jean Babinot
Paul Babinot
Silvain Babinot
Marguerite Babinot
Dominique Babinot
Jean Babinot
Marie Babinot
Jean Baptiste Babinot
Marguerite Babinot
Charles Babinot

Joseph Suret
Ysabelle Suret

Firmin Broussard
Anne Broussard
Marguerite Broussard
Charles Broussard
Françoise Broussard

Pierre Paul Douaron
Marguerite Douaron
Marie Douaron
Magdelaine

Pierre Douaron
Marguerite Douaron
Jacques Douaron
Charles Douaron

Joseph Le Blanc
Marie Le Blanc
Firmin Le Blanc
Joseph Le Blanc
Marguerite Le Blanc
Blandine Le Blanc
Jean Le Blanc

Joseph Gaudet
Magdelaine Gaudet
Joseph Gaudet
Jean Gaudet
Pierre Gaudet
Magdelaine Gaudet
Blanche Gaudet

Pierre Gaudet
Anne Gaudeet
Pierre Gaudet
Marguerite Gaudet
Modeste Gaudet
Marie Gaudet
Marie Gaudet

Paul Gaudet
Marie Gaudet
Joseph Gaudet
Pierre Gaudet

Marguerite Gaudet
Dominique Gaudet
Modeste Gaudet
Théotiste Gaudet
Michel Gaudet

René Poirier
Anne Poirier
Jean Poirier
Marie Poirier
Noémie Poirier
Alexis Poirier
Pierre Poirier
Joseph Poirier
Modeste Poirier
Victor Poirier

Louis Gaudet
Marie Gaudet
Marie Gaudet
Magdelaine Gaudet
Jean Gaudet
Pointif Gaudet

Jean Nuirat
Françoise Nuirat
David Nuirat


Charles Gaudet
Marguerite Gaudet
Félix Gaudet
Rosalie Gaudet
Pierre Gaudet
Marie Gaudet
Anne Gaudet


Pierre Gaudet
Magdeleine Gaudet
Marie Gaudet
Pierre Gaudet
Félicité Gaudet
Mathurin Gaudet
Jean Gaudet

Pierre Sire
Anne Sire

Joseph Richard
Anne Richard
Malenne Richard
Rozalie Richard
Marie Richard
Joseph Richard
Germain Richard

Michel Sire
Magdelaine Sire
Geneviève Sire
Michel Sire
Vincent Sire

Jean Girouard
Magdelaine Girouard
Marie Girouard
Françoise Girouard
Joseph Girouard
Modeste Girouard

Michel Bourg
Marguerite Bourg
Blanche Bourg
Michel Bourg
Magdelaine Bourg
Marie Bourg
Bleme Bourg
Pierre Bourgeois

Joseph Prejant
Marie Prejant
Agathe Prejant

Jean Dubois
Marie Dubois
Rozalie Dubois
Marguerite Dubois

Cyprien Dupuy
Françopise Dupuy
Magdelaine Dupuy
Jean Dupuy

Paul Gautrot
Anne Gautrot
Joseph Gautrot

Paul Landry
Magdelaine Landry
Modeste Landry
Jean David

Pierre Boudrot
Magdelaine Boudrot
Hylaire Boudrot
Jean Boudrot
Joseph Boudrot

Joseph La Pierre
Rozalie La Pierre
Magdelaine La Pierre
Marguerite La Pierre
Claire La Pierre
AnneLa Pierre
Jean La Pierre
Joseph La Pierre
Charles La Pierre
Ysabelle La Pierre


Pierre Rostegui
Marie Rostegui
François Rostegui
Anne Rostegui
Jean Rostegui
Marguerite Rostegui
Marie Rostegui

Pierre Rostegui
Isabelle Rostegui
Marguerite Rostegui
Joseph Rostegui

Joseph Quessy
Marie Joseph Quessy
Marie Quessy
Magdelaine Quessy
Pierre Quessy
Jean BaptisteQuessy
JosephQuessy
Etienne Quessy
Nastazie Quessy


Joseph Boudrot
Rozalie Boudrot
Joseph Boudrot
Charles Boudrot
Marguerite Boudrot
Anne Boudrot
Amant Boudrot
Thomas Boudrot

Charles Gautrot
Françoise Gautrot

Claude Poirier
Marguerite Poirier
Allain Poirier
Marguerite Poirier
Louis Poirier
Charles Poirier
Marie Poirier
Ester Poirier
Magdelaine Poirier
Jean Poirier

Charles Dugas
Pierre Dugas
Mazarin Dugas
Ozitte Dugas
Jean Dugas

Pierre Melanson
Félicité Melanson
Marguerite Melanson
Pierre Melanson

Amant Girouard
Marguerite Girouard
Joseph Girouard

Charles Forest
Marie Forest
Jean Forest
Paul Forest
Marguerite Forest
Anne Forest
Modeste Forest
Ursule Forest

Jean Guedry
Marie Guedry
Jean Guedry
Alexandre Guedry

Michel Haché
Magdelaine Haché
Félicité Haché

Pierre Arsenau
Judith Arsenau
Michel Arsenau
Etienne Arsenau
Joseph Arsenau

Jean Arsenau
Magdelaine Arsenau
Jean Arsenau
Bazile Arsenau
Louise Arsenau

Claude Boudrot
Judith Boudrot
Michel Boudrot
Pierre Boudrot
Nastazie Boudrot

Pierre Chiasson
Marie Joseph Chiasson
Joseph Chiasson
Lucie Chiasson

Joseph Hébert
Louise Hébert
Marguerite Hébert

Joseph Bourg
Anne Bourg
Michel Bourg
Abraham Bourg
Pierre Bourg
Anne Bourg
Magdelaine Bourg
Marie Bourg
Jean Bourg

Claude Boudrot
Magdelaine Boudrot
Marie Boudrot
Marguerite Boudrot

Louis Allain
Anne Allain
Magdelaine Allain
Marguerite Allain
Benjamin Allain
Michel Allain
Marie Allain
Baptiste Allain
Joseph Allain

Jacques Leger
Marie Leger
Charles Leger
Anne Marie Miron
Joseph Leger

Jean Richard
Françoise Richard
Joseph Richard
Anne Richard

Jean Bro
Marie Bro
Lucie Bro

Amand Bujeau
Marie Bujeau
Adélaide Bujeau
Jean Bujeau

Jean Cormier
Marie Cormier
Marie Cormier
Magdelaine Cormier
François Cormier
Pierre Cormier
Nastazie Cormier
Pierre Cormier


Pierre Ouel(Onel?)
Anne Ouel(Onel?)
Pierre Ouel(Onel?)
Magdelaine Ouel(Onel?)
Angélique Ouel(Onel?)

Pierre Bastarache
Anne Bastarache
Anne Bastarache
Joseph Bastarache
Ester Bastarache
Ysidore Bastarache

Joseph Guéguen
Anne Guéguen
Joseph Guéguen
Jean Guéguen
Marie Guéguen

Michel Bastarache
Marguerite Bastarache
Félicité Bastarache
Marguerite Bastarache
Marie Rose Bastarache
Anne Bastarache

Charles Melanson
Anne Melanson
Jean Melandon
Charles Melandon
Pierre Melanson
Anne Melanson

Cyprien Porlier
Cécile Porlier
Pierre Porlier

Pierre Melanson
Marie Melanson
Marie Melanson
Jean Melanson
Joseph Melanson

Pierre Richard
Magdelaine Richard
Anne Richard
Baptiste Richard
Jean Richard
François Richard
Michel Richard
Marguerite
Bazile Richard

Joseph Richard
Marie Richard
Marguerite Richard
Roze Richard
Joseph Richard

Jean Gaudet
Jeanne Gaudet
Marie Gaudet
Poncy Gaudet

Jean-Baptiste Gaudet
Anne Gaudet
Marie Joseph Gaudet
Joseph Gaudet
Anne Gaudet
Magdelaine Gaudet
Nastazie Gaudet


Etienne Le Blanc
Ysabelle Le Blanc
Simon Le Blanc
Etienne Le Blanc
Mathuerin Le Blanc
Joseph Le Blanc
Anne Le Blanc
Marguerite Le Blanc
Magdeleine Le Blanc


Amant Lanoue
Marie Lanoue

Pierre Chiasson
Ozit Chiasson
Michel Chiasson
Joseph Chiasson

Paul Hébert
Marguerite Hébert

Amant Bujeau
Claire Bujeau

Pierre Leger
Marguerite Leger
Ester Leger


Jean Caylon, surgeon
Jeanne Caylon
Marie Caylon


This family also signed:

Pierre Douaron
Marguerite Douaron
Joseph Douaron
Charles Douaron

Names of famlies at
Isle aux Perdrix:

Françcois Arsenaux
Jeanot Bourgeois

TOTAL PRISONERS AT FORT CUMBERLAND: 370


The names listed above are all of the Acadians who are presently prisoners at Fort LCumberland on 24 August 1763. Thre are less than fifty some odd families on Ile St-Jean and along the coast who, we belive, desire the same as we do; but they have not yet heard the news but we will do our best to inform them as soon as possible.

This whole document was in the handwriting of Joseph Guéguen.[The census and statement was made by Joseph Gueguen.]

Ft.Beausejour

Acadians Escape from Ft. Beauséjour/Cumberland

In approximately February of 1756 (during the years of deportations and exiles for the Acadians), plotted and successfully escaped from their imprisonment at Ft. Beauséjour (which was later renamed Ft. Cumberland by the British).

Though there were not many details available, there was enough evidence to affirm the fact that it did happen providing some information as well as to howw it happened.

As testimony to this escape, Father François Le Guerne, who was their missionary, wrote a long letter from Belair, near Cocagne, New Brunswick, on March 10, 1756. His letter was addressed to Chevalier de Drucours, Governor of Louisbourg in which he writes about what Pierre Surrette told him with regards to the British at Ft. Beauséjour/Cumberland.

I hold this (information) from Pierre Surette ... This man, formerly a captain in the militia of Petcoudiac, is sensible and of good judgment, and well versed in public affairs, and was often employed by our Messieurs Officers in delicate matters.

The English had kept him this winter at the fort as a man of reason who knew the country and might be useful to them. His agreeable manner of speech gave him a free access to the Commander of the fort [Mr. Scot], who thought him secure, so much so, that he spoke his mind openly to him. He knows the English language and is ever ready to converse with anyone, and they were in the habit of holding nothing in reserve when talking with him.

The leader of this daring escape was Pierre Surrette II born 9 December 1709 in Port-Royal. He was the son of Pierre and Jeanne Pellerin. In 1755, his home was in Beauséjour which was located between the border of Acadia (Nova Scotia) and New Brunswick. This fort still stands there today as a testimony to our ancestors.

On August 11, 1755, the Acadians of this area were ordered to report to Ft. Beauséjour. Approximately 250 Acadians went tot he Fort though a good number fearing it a ploy of the British, escaped and hid in the woods. Our Pierre Surrette and others, who had planned to hide in the woods, waited too long and were captured and taken to Ft. Beausejour. It was from here that they escaped during the night of February 26, 1756, under the leadership of Pierre.

The story of this escape has been told from generation to generation - it is one of the oral histories of a family. The story told is that these prisoners were fed horse meat as their ration and that Pierre suggested they save some of the rib bones which they would hide in the day and use at night digging a tunnel under the outer wall of the fort. Of course, during the day, they camouflaged or hid their work. When February 26th rolled along, they were ready to escape and 80 men did.

It seems that Pierre Melanson was the biggest and burliest man of the group and that he got stuck in the middle of the tunnel. Fortunately, he was able to free himself in the nick of time so as to escape the guards who had heard the noise and who were right behind them as they ran from the fort. Fortunately, the Acadians knew these woods better than did the British so they were able to make quick their getaway.

Following his escape, Pierre Surrette and family, as well as other Acadian families, stayed hidden in the woods, not far in that area. However, two years of misery and starvation, eating roots, meat of decayed animals, and even the excrement of animals (as told by Father Le Guerne) this group of Acadians to the area of Miramichi. Their situation worsenend. In the end, they surrendered to the British in the vicinity of Petcoudiac and Memramcook on 18 November 1759. At this time, 700 Acadians led by Pierre Surrette and Jean and Michel Bourquewere taken to Halifax and kept prisoners until the signing of the Treaty of Paris in 1763.

After their release from prison, Pierre and his family remained in the region of Halifax for about 6 or 7 years until they could decide on where they would resettle. Three of their children had their marriages blessed in Chezzetcook by l'Abbé Bailly according to the registers for 1769.

Not too much later, Pierre Surrette with his son Joseph and his three sons-in-law - Joseph Babin, Jean Bourque and Dominique Pothier, decided to settle at Sainte-Anne-du-Ruisseau and Belleville. They became the ancestors of the Acadians bearing those names in Yarmouth County, Nova Scotia.

Pierre Surette had married in Grand-Pré on 30 September 1732 to Catherine Breau, daughter of Pierre Breau and of Anne LeBlanc. According to Father d'Entremont, Anne is the ancestral mother of many Acadians in southwestern Nova Scotia. According the oral tradition, she was buried toward the shore of Salt Bay or Sal Water Marsh at Ste-Anne-du-Ruiseau. The first road ever built in what was then Eel Brook used to go through here, along the shore. It was the pasageway that the narrow-gage railway would follow up to Argyle, after having followed the western edge of Eel Lake from close to Belleville, traces of which are still visible



Reference: Father Clarence d'Entremont



SOURCE: Sincere thanks from the Acadian Ancestral Home to La Société Historique Acadienne for their permission to post this article.
La Société Historique Acadienne,March 1965, Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada.
The source noted for La Société Historique Acadienne for this information was Archives nationales, Fonds des Colonies, C. 12 (Correspondance générale, Saint Pierre et Miquelon, vol. 1, f. 22-26.


© Lucie LeBlanc Consentino
Acadian & French Canadian Ancestral Home
1998 - Present



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